Sunday, October 21, 2018

With regard to Transportation Modeling, Toronto & East York Precinct is 'Special'



By Michael Holloway

When Transportation Division engineers model traffic flows on their computers using massive data-bases, they model traffic across the city that moves as many cars as possible.

While that may be appropriate in the areas of the City outside the old City of Toronto that were built for the most part post-world-war-two, and were designed mainly with car transportation in mind (long distances to destinations; cul-de-sac neighbourhoods surrounded by 4 and 6 lane major arterials), the old city is built differently - a grid of local roads every 100 metres with 4-lane major arterials and collectors every 500 metres); in this precinct, only moving lots of cars is not appropriate.



The big difference is two-fold:
  • The suburban road network is designed to accommodate flows via major arterial roads and 400 series highways to the core - a massive employment district;
  • The core road network is built to manage that massive influx and out-routing of employment and delivery traffic flow.

What makes the old Toronto special is that it is the focus of so much destination travel - and the road network focuses traffic into an increasingly congested road network the closer you get to the downtown core. Plus all the people who live in the old city (markedly higher population density than the suburbs) also use the road network to travel much shorter distances to and from jobs in the core.

Ask any long-commute driver where the road network becomes intolerably congested and they will reply about a spot generally marking a point somewhere near the border between the new city and the old city of Toronto.

It's a function of the road network and destination desires.

To reduce congestion on these old city arterial roadways we need to facilitate mass transit and active transportation alternatives.

Street car right-of-ways are a blight on the urban landscape - they divide neighbourhoods much like 6-lane arterials do. They are - in this author's opinion - a reaction to car congestion, not a solution to it. The trick of it is to reduce the number of cars on the roadway at peak, and that will free up space such that mass public transit can flow efficiently on our roadways without dedicated tramways.

Making every major arterial in Toronto and East York a complete street has the possibility of reducing the numbers of cars on these roadways from local sources by as much as 70%.

Make Driving Great Again?


And we do this NOT for the Bike Lobby - but to make on-street mass public transit flow smoothly. By reducing the number of cars on the roadway through complete street infrastructure changes - we are thus making drivers into both cycle commuters, and mass transit commuters; and we're changing individuals who must drive from deadly, raging scofflaws into smooth-flow happy commuters - which makes the city safer and happier for everyone.

Complete Streets Infrastructure Every Time Curbs are Renewed


Transportation Division manages must develop data modeling that reflects this reality - and design new (but already designed in many, many examples from around the globe) street configurations which reflect this special character of Toronto & East York; and politicians must change a slew of policies across Divisions that makes sure our already almost 20-years old 'complete streets policy' actually creates complete streets every time ROW's are renewed.

Recent examples where complete streets were not installed when curbs were renewed:

2012 - Leslie Street south of Queen
2016 - Broadview Avenue north of Danforth
2017 - Kingston Road, Queen to Victoria Park
2018 - Donlands Avenue, Danforth to O'Connor
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Image via Wikimedia Commons - https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a6/Old_Toronto_locator.png

Michael Holloway
Ward 30 Bikes
Outreach Coordinator


P.S. The active transportation lobby needs a contact within Transportation Division; an engineer who can share traffic modelling of (for example) the flows described above (thinking Not sharing massive (propitiatory) files, but using a mobile to shoot onscreen modelling which your colleagues or yourself have built as part of your daily work which may be of some use to progressive transportation advocates).




^mh

Friday, October 12, 2018

Ward Candidate Active Transportation Survey Results


This is an alphabetically ordered list of all the registered candidates running in new Ward 14: Toronto-Danforth - and the contact information we dug up for them online:

(The names of all those who responded have links down to their answers.)

Lanrick Bennett - lanrick@lanrickbennettjr.ca
Chris Budo - chrisbudotoronto@gmail.com
Dixon Chan - Dixon@dixon2018.com
Marisol D'Andrea - VoteDandrea@gmail.com
Paula Fletcher (Inc.) - info@paulafletcher.com
Mary Fragedakis (Inc.) - teamfragedakis@gmail.com
Ryan Lindsay - (no public email) http://www.ryanlindsay.ca/contact
Lawrence Lychowyd - (no public email) http://www.larrythelawyer.ca/Contact.shtml
Chris Marinakis - (no public email) https://chrismarinakis.ca/contact-us
Alexander Pena - (no website, no online search results at all)

On October 10th at 5:26 PM we emailed all the registered candidates (that we could find an address for) and asked them these five questions phrased exactly like this:



Responses


Below are their responses - ordered in the order they replied to us with their answers.
Marisol D'Andrea - D'Andrea Campaign Photo From Marisol D'Andrea (received October 10, 2018 at 9:03:29 PM EDT):

1. Will you be a champion for building safe, connected bike routes in Toronto Danforth?

Yes.


2. Will you support building protected bike lanes on main streets, including the major corridors in the Cycling Network Plan?

Yes.


3. Do you support accelerating the City’s 10-Year Cycling Network Plan to be built in the next four years, instead of by 2026?

Absolutely.


4. Can you provide your position on adding physical separation + Protected Intersections to the Dundas bike lanes?

I support it. The Protected Intersection design has promise. If there is any interference with traffic and pedestrians, the bikes should have traffic lights to have a safe flow of traffic and pedestrians.


5. Can you provide your position on the Danforth complete street study and implementation?

I support the Danforth complete street study and implementation. Over 70% of Torontonians, including myself, would cycle more if infrastructure were improved. The implementation of the Danforth bike lane will complement my platform on the revitalization of the Danforth. We need to consider adding physical separation + protected intersections to some of the main intersections, such as Coxwell Avenue and Main Street. In addition, we need a better toolbox for effective implementation, including education and engagement. I will work hard for this plan to come to fruition.


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Dixon Chan Twitter image From Dixon Chan (received October 10, 2018 at 9:31:16 PM EDT):

1. Will you be a champion for building safe, connected bike routes in Toronto Danforth?

Yes.


2. Will you support building protected bike lanes on main streets, including the major corridors in the Cycling Network Plan?

Yes.


3. Do you support accelerating the City’s 10-Year Cycling Network Plan to be built in the next four years, instead of by 2026?

Yes.


4. Can you provide your position on adding physical separation + Protected Intersections to the Dundas bike lanes?

I believe that we need to update the complete Street Guidelines with safer separated and curb protected cycling lanes and protected intersections. When a street is designated for a Complete Street design, the blueprints for a protected lane will be visually referenced in the guideline.


5. Can you provide your position on the Danforth complete street study and implementation?

I’m definitely in favour of a complete street redesign of Danforth.

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Lanrick Bennett Jr. Twitter image From Lanrick Bennett Jr. (received October 12, 2018 at 2:22:01 PM EDT):

1. Will you be a champion for building safe, connected bike routes in Toronto Danforth?

As an avid cyclist and father of two children, safety on our streets is a paramount concern of mine. Our community has waited 15 years for a champion for safe, protected and connected bike lanes throughout our Ward. As City Councillor, I will ensure that we have a coherent plan to keep our roads safe.


2. Will you support building protected bike lanes on main streets, including the major corridors in the Cycling Network Plan?

I look forward to reviewing the recommendations of the Cycling Network Plan. It is my firm belief that we can and should add dedicated, protected bike lanes on the Danforth to enhance road safety while minimizing the impact on parking and businesses.


3. Do you support accelerating the City’s 10-Year Cycling Network Plan to be built in the next four years, instead of by 2026?

I know that we need to do more to protect cyclists and pedestrians in our city. That is why as Councillor, I will support initiatives to help accelerate the creation of protected bike lanes throughout Toronto-Danforth and the city of Toronto as a whole.


4. Can you provide your position on adding physical separation + Protected Intersections to the Dundas bike lanes?

With the tragic death at Jones and Dundas, we have seen what happens when bike lanes are built without barriers. It was back in 2002 that we saw the bike lanes on Dundas created, and since then, we have put paint before protection. That is why I support the creation of protected bike lanes for cyclists on Dundas, and I will make sure these bike lanes are connected on a grid to ensure we can all commute safely.


5. Can you provide your position on the Danforth complete street study and implementation?

I know that we need to work hard to meet our goal of zero pedestrian deaths on our streets. That is why I will support the implementation of Toronto’s Complete Streets guidelines so we can share the road and increase pedestrian safety.

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Mary Fragedakis Ward 14 Twitter image From Mary Fragedakis (received October 13, 2018 at 3:23:36 PM EDT):

1. Will you be a champion for building safe, connected bike routes in Toronto Danforth?

Yes. I think we need to strengthen north south routes as well as work to make intersections safer – for all users. Last but not least, as a youth, I used to bike around Toronto-Danforth. I would like to have City Transportation staff work to develop a program to enhance bike safety in local neighbourhoods.


2. Will you support building protected bike lanes on main streets, including the major corridors in the Cycling Network Plan?

Yes. I supported the Cycling Network Plan and I voted to increase its budget. As a Councillor I have never voted against a bike lane.


3. Do you support accelerating the City’s 10-Year Cycling Network Plan to be built in the next four years, instead of by 2026?

Yes, I have voted to spend more in order to accelerate the implementation of the Cycling Network Plan. I would like us to make the Cycling Network safer.


4. Can you provide your position on adding physical separation + Protected Intersections to the Dundas bike lanes?

Again, I think it is so important to make bike lanes safe. As we build more bike infrastructure we attract more cyclists. This is a good thing but it means we need to make those lanes safer and intersections safer. Though I can see starting with the Dundas bike lanes, we need to roll this out elsewhere.


5. Can you provide your position on the Danforth complete street study and implementation?

I moved the successful motion at City Council to have the Danforth Major Corridor study done from a Complete Street perspective. I was disappointed that City staff delayed the Danforth Major Corridor study to focus on projects where they could take advantage of funding from the federal government.

We should get the Danforth Major Corridor Study and Avenue Planning study going in 2019 to create a new Danforth that is revitalized but that preserves what is special about the Danforth.


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@PaulaFletcher36 Twitter profile image From Paula Fletcher (received October 15, 2018 at 7:00:52 PM EDT):

1. Will you be a champion for building safe, connected bike routes in Toronto Danforth?

Yes - I have always supported fully protected, connected cycling routes in Toronto-Danforth. I’m proud to have pushed for a comprehensive corridor study to bring bike lanes onto the Danforth in a permanent, defensible way. I ride my bike to work and around the ward, and I know how important it is to improve safety for all of us.


2. Will you support building protected bike lanes on main streets, including the major corridors in the Cycling Network Plan?

Absolutely - including the Danforth, using a ‘complete streets’ approach and involving businesses and residents in the planning process. We have bike lanes on some of the major corridors, but they need to be refreshed and separated. I know there is more to be done - intersections can be made more safe with protected turning lanes. I will work with you to make these improvements a reality.


3. Do you support accelerating the City’s 10-Year Cycling Network Plan to be built in the next four years, instead of by 2026?

Yes I do. There have been too many tragedies and close calls on our streets for us to delay on building the full Cycling Network.


4. Can you provide your position on adding physical separation + Protected Intersections to the Dundas bike lanes?

I am fully in favour of this proposal. In 2016 I requested that City staff begin looking at opportunities for separation, and I have recently requested the General Manager for Transportation Services look at installing protected intersections on Dundas. I will be working with her to make this happen for our community


5. Can you provide your position on the Danforth complete street study and implementation?

I am proud to have gotten this study underway. The cycling community has long pushed for complete streets on the Danforth that include separated bike lanes - and I agree. I believe the Danforth corridor study is the best way to make sure that these lanes go in and stay in.

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Ryan Lindsay campaign site photo cropped From Ryan Lindsay (received October 16, 2018 at 4:12 PM EDT - via Twitter):

1. Will you be a champion for building safe, connected bike routes in Toronto Danforth?

Yes I will continue to champion a safe, connected bike network in this ward.


2. Will you support building protected bike lanes on main streets, including the major corridors in the Cycling Network Plan?

Yes, I will fight for protected bike lanes on main streets, including Danforth, Carlaw, Broadview, Donlands, Samon/Browning, Cosburn, Dundas, Woodfield, Eastern...


3. Do you support accelerating the City’s 10-Year Cycling Network Plan to be built in the next four years, instead of by 2026?

Yes, I support the acceleration of the building the cycling network, so that we can complete it by 2022 instead of 2026. We can't wait any longer to get this city moving!


4. Can you provide your position on adding physical separation + Protected Intersections to the Dundas bike lanes?

Yes, I support physically separated lanes and protected intersections on Dundas E, and am disappointed how long this has taken. Everyone, whether on bike, in a car, or on foot, feels and IS safer when bike lanes are physically separated. Let's get this done asap.


5. Can you provide your position on the Danforth complete street study and implementation?

I support a complete streets approach along #theDanforth, from he Bloor Viaduct to Victoria Park. There's enough room for cyclists, pedestrians and vehicles, and such an approach will increase safety, health & support of local business. #topoli #torontodanforth

[See the thread on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/fundevolution/status/1052287413089779712]


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Lawrence Lychowyd Twitter profile image retrieved 2018/10/18 From Lawrence Lychowyd (received October 17, 2018 at 3:22 PM EDT - via Twitter Messages):

1. Will you be a champion for building safe, connected bike routes in Toronto Danforth?

Yes. The routes must make sense as far as being an effective route for cyclists while maintaining the economic vitality of the surrounding neighbourhoods where applicable.


2. Will you support building protected bike lanes on main streets, including the major corridors in the Cycling Network Plan?

Yes. Protected bike lanes make the most sense and when I am driving alongside a cyclist, I feel safer when there is that physical divider between us. I do not support bike lanes on routes with streetcars as the traffic congestion resulting from same would just be magnified. There is not enough room on those routes for streetcars, cyclists, car traffic and parking.


3. Do you support accelerating the City’s 10-Year Cycling Network Plan to be built in the next four years, instead of by 2026?

Yes. Like any transit initiative, this will never get cheaper to do and if we want to encourage cycling as an alternative to vehicular traffic as another cog in the total environmental plan it needs to be done.


4. Can you provide your position on adding physical separation + Protected Intersections to the Dundas bike lanes?

I have no issue this being done on Dundas Street in our ward.


5. Can you provide your position on the Danforth complete street study and implementation?

I would be in favour of a well planned remodel of the Danforth provided that the business owners along the strip were active participants in the design and that it can be shown that there would not be a severe economic impact on the businesses that run this economic engine of the City.


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^mh

Friday, August 24, 2018

W30B republishes Cycle Toronto's "We’re one month away from the Ride for Safe Streets" email

Spaces are limited, so register today.
August 24, 2018


Hi People who cycle,


Do you love riding on protected bike lanes, but wish there were more - and that they were better connected?

We hear all the time from our members that they want to ride more - but don’t feel confident where there’s only a painted line, or nothing at all, separating them from motor vehicle traffic.
That’s why we’re running our #BuildtheGrid campaign to get bike lanes in neighbourhoods across the city. The Ride for Safe Streets directly supports our advocacy work - which is needed more than ever in this political climate.   

Register to ride today for $40 to help us push for change this election year. Add a Cycle Toronto membership for an additional $20. 


With your support, we can grow our #BuildtheGrid campaign and make protected bike lanes on Bloor St (east of Avenue Rd, and west of Shaw St), Danforth Ave, Yonge St, and beyond, a reality.

When you ride with us on September 22, you’ll be riding for change. All proceeds go towards our advocacy work, from training advocates in neighbourhoods across the city, to working with councillors and the Mayor at City Hall to ensure bike lanes remain on the agenda.

Over half of the ride spots are full, so don’t wait! Register right now.

We hope you’ll join us for the ride,

Mark Romeril
Development Manager






Republished by,
Michael Holloway
Outreach Coordinator,
Ward 30 Bikes